Death of a Hot Chick


A young wid­ow try­ing to sur­vive, a ghost with an agen­da, and the boat they share.

HotChick-Cover1That’s the ele­va­tor pitch for Death of a Hot Chick. What is an ele­va­tor pitch, you ask? That’s when an author finds her­self in an ele­va­tor with an agent and she wants to tell said agent all about her won­der­ful book before the door opens.

I’m not look­ing for an agent. I want to tell read­ers about my mys­tery and the ele­va­tor pitch works for that too. I could tell you more, but instead, I’ll talk about the cov­er. The boat pic­tured is real. Some years before I wrote this book, I saw the orig­i­nal Snap­drag­on. I took pic­tures and asked the own­er if I could place a mur­der mys­tery on her boat. She agreed, with one reser­va­tion. Not gonna tell you what that one was, but I will tell you, per­haps she should have asked for more.

Since Death of a Hot Chick is now avail­able for all e-read­ers, as well as in paper­back, I want to show them all in one place. Do check them out.

Ama­zon | Barnes & Noble | Kin­dle | Nook | Kobo | iBook | BAM | 24symbols |

 

Five Star Read — THE ANTEATER OF DEATH

Anteater coverNow, you have to admit—The Anteater of Death is an unusu­al name for a mys­tery sto­ry. Okay—crazy! But I tru­ly like it. It’s got a lot going for it.

A. The name attracts atten­tion. (Always good.)

B. The sto­ry lives up to the title. (Also good.)

C. The anteater (in a zoo, thank­ful­ly) is not only a sus­pect in mur­der, but has a devot­ed advo­cate in the hero­ine of the story—Teddy, the ama­teur detec­tive.

This was how I put it a cou­ple of months ago when I read The Anteater of Death:

The plot is full of unex­pect­ed twists, the char­ac­ters are most­ly known to eah oth­er (for gen­er­a­tions) and quite indi­vid­ual. The sus­pense is right up there, along with enough humor to fit the title. But there is also sus­pense to keep the read­er on the edge of her (or his) seat. The book starts and ends with a chap­ter in the anteater’s viewpoint—quite a bit dif­fer­ent than a human view­point. In between it’s Teddy’s sto­ry. She’s relat­ed to the wealthy zoo donors and work­ing at the zoo. And yes, there is death. Great sto­ry for those look­ing for the unusu­al sub­ject. Spiced with zoo and ani­mal infor­ma­tion.

Right now the Kin­dle ebook is $.99. Bet­ty Webb is the author. She has two oth­er zoo books, and a desert series of mys­ter­ies.

Agatha Short Story Nominees

Agatha awards, so named for Agatha Christie of mys­tery writ­ing fame, are giv­en every year at the Mal­ice Domes­tic con­fer­ence. One award is giv­en for the top short sto­ry pub­lished the pre­vi­ous year. This year’s nom­i­nees are all win­ners, even though only one will receive the tea pot that is the cov­et­ed prize. Nom­i­nat­ed for Best Short Sto­ry are:

The Odds are Against Us” by Art Tay­lor, Ellery Queen Mys­tery Mag­a­zine, Nov. 2014
“Pre­mo­ni­tion” by Art Tay­lor, Chesa­peake Crimes Homi­ci­dal Hol­i­days (Wild­side Press)
“The Shad­ow Knows” by Barb Goff­man, Chesa­peake Crimes Homi­ci­dal Hol­i­days (Wild­side Press)
“Just Desserts for John­ny” by Edith Maxwell (Kings Riv­er Life Mag­a­zine)
“The Bless­ing Witch” by Kathy Lynn Emer­son, Best New Eng­land Crime Sto­ries 2015: Rogue Wave (Lev­el Best Books)

Those who attend Mal­ice Domes­tic this year are in for a dilem­ma. Which of these excel­lent sto­ries will they vote for? What idea sparked the sto­ry? Find that answer on the Wicked Cozy Author blog, Best Short Agatha Nom­i­nees on Ideas. The Writ­ers Who Kill blog asked each writer oth­er ques­tions. How many char­ac­ters? How should they be devel­oped? What comes first, sto­ry or theme? Their post is: An Inter­view with the 2014 Agatha Best Short Sto­ry Nom­i­nee Authors. They also have links to each sto­ry.

Wish I were going to Mal­ice Domes­tic, except, then I’d have to decide which sto­ry was best. Quite an impos­si­bil­i­ty.

(Oth­er links of inter­est are the Mal­ice Domes­tic list of ear­li­er short sto­ry win­ners and all more recent win­ners.)

 

Five Stars For LITTLE BLACK BOOK OF MURDER

Nancy Martin cover1I’ve read and thor­ough­ly enjoyed the Black­bird Sis­ters mys­ter­ies by Nan­cy Mar­tin, but this is my lat­est. (Not hers, but I’m a bit behind.) The three sis­ters make do with­out the mon­ey they grew up with (and their par­ents mis­spent before they desert­ed the crum­bling fam­i­ly home). Nora tries to keep body and soul togeth­er, save the fam­i­ly estate, and, oh, yes, not mar­ry the man she loves who just hap­pens to be a semi-reformed mob­ster. You see, there’s this thing about any man who mar­ries one of the sis­ters (there have been sev­er­al) dying a sud­den and usu­al­ly dread­ful death.

That is some­thing that runs through all the books. But the sis­ters have a lot more going on. Babies, for one. That’s one sister’s specialty—she’s had many hus­bands. Mys­tery for anoth­er. A mys­tery that involves Nora more than any­one. In this book, Nora is sent by the new boss at her news­pa­per to write a pro­file on a bil­lion­aire fash­ion design­er at his new high-tech organ­ic farm. Unfor­tu­nate­ly, he is mur­dered before she can com­plete the inter­view.

To quote from the Goodreads descrip­tion, “If any­thing can bring the blue-blood­ed Black­bird sis­ters togeth­er, it’s a mur­der inves­ti­ga­tion involv­ing high-soci­ety events, glam­orous peo­ple, and the dis­ap­pear­ance of a genet­i­cal­ly per­fect pig that may or may not be bask­ing in the sun at Black­bird Farm. They’ll all have to pull togeth­er this time, because if Nora can’t bring home the bacon, she might have to exchange her bucol­ic estate for a cramped walk-up.”

The Black­bird Sis­ters mys­ter­ies are always great reads. I espe­cial­ly liked this one. Lots of fun and fash­ion, mys­tery and dan­ger. Nora and her sis­ters keep me enthralled!

Seasonal Thoughts

Sea­son­al? Not as in salt and pep­per or onion flakes. Oh, no. As in, it must be fall because kids went back to school, despite the fact that fall does not offi­cial­ly arrive until lat­er in Sep­tem­ber. So, since it IS fall, Hal­loween must be close behind. How do I know? My local gro­cery store has a full dis­play of Hal­loween Tastykakes. Yum!

Def­i­nite­ly time for spooky thoughts. Ghosts, mag­ic, and spooky para­nor­mal mys­tery books. Yes!

One series of choice for the sea­son is L. L. Bartlett’s Jeff Resnick series. Bartlett (under two oth­er names) writes two of my favorite cozy mys­tery series, but this is more of a psy­cho­log­i­cal thriller. Jeff has dreams, or visions, of mur­der. How spooky is that? The first in the series is Mur­der on the Mind. The newest one, Dark Waters, comes out on Octo­ber 1, 2013.

Anoth­er favorite series is Sofie Kelly’s Mag­i­cal Cats mys­tery series. Are those cats real, ghosts, or what? One that I read is Curios­i­ty Thrilled The Cat. The newest one, Final Cat­call, also comes out Octo­ber 1, 2013.

Soon I hope to announce my newest mys­tery, a spooky young adult titled Cher­ish. There are ghosts, time trav­el, and Hal­loween involved in this one.

I keep try­ing to get com­ments active on this post. Maybe this time? Don’t know yet. How­ev­er, com­ments will be open on my Goodreads blog tomor­row.