The Eagle Has Hatched!

I must take a pass on shar­ing my War of 1812 research. Over a month ago I blogged about a pair of eagles on their nest of two eggs. Then we had snow on the first day of spring. How were the eagles faring?

Yes, you see an eagle head.

Yes, you see an eagle head.

This pic­ture might give you a clue. They were keep­ing those eggs warm. (An author­i­ty answered wor­ried watch­ers, “Notice the snow does­n’t melt over the par­ent. That means his or her feath­ers are keep­ing the body well insulated.”)

Now, this morn­ing our paper had the news—the first egg had hatched! Byeagle feeds baby the time I sat down at my com­put­er to write this blog, the sec­ond egg had hatched and the first eaglet had already had its first meal. Fish bits, yum, yum. Mam­ma (or Papa) had to keep try­ing to con­nect with the tiny wob­bling beak.

Here’s some inter­est­ing arti­cles to read and videos to watch: Arti­cle in this morn­ing’s news­pa­per. Video-first egg hatch­es. Video-sec­ond egg hatch­es. A first meal.

Eagles on the Nest

The tem­per­a­ture is about to hit zero in my part of Penn­syl­va­nia. Who knew it is eagle nest­ing time? Not me, until I noticed an arti­cle about a near­by eagle nest with an eagle cam mount­ed to see all the eagle’s inti­mate moments. Lay­ing egg one? Got that. Egg two? You bet. I just checked the eagle cam and saw one of the eagles stand­ing by, watch­ing the eggs, before she (or he—they take turns) set­tled back down.

I also learned a lit­tle bit about eagles and their eggs. Cold as it is, it evi­dent­ly does­n’t hurt the eggs to be uncov­ered for ten or so min­utes. In fact, that keeps them from being over­heat­ed. Anoth­er fact—it takes thir­ty-five days for an egg to hatch.

Here’s a few links to fol­low our local eagles, named Lib­er­ty and Free­dom by news­pa­per read­ers. That’s unof­fi­cial, since the Penn­syl­va­nia Game Com­mis­sion, whose cam­era is livestream­ing these eagles and their nest, does not “per­son­i­fy wildlife.” (I should imag­ine the eagles are unaware of these names as well.)

The Valen­tine’s Day love story.

The first egg. The sec­ond egg.

And, since every sto­ry should have a bit of con­tro­ver­sy—were the eagles scared off the nest?

And here’s the eagle cam, so you can watch at any time. Plan on view­ing on March 21, the esti­mat­ed time for the first hatching.

Are there any eagle cams near you? Are there any oth­er ani­mals watched by camera?