Cozy Mystery Day

It’s Agatha Christie’s Birthday — Let’s Celebrate International Cozy Mystery Day

Did you know Sep­tem­ber 15 is Agatha Christie’s birth­day? Since Dame Christie’s mys­ter­ies start­ed the mys­tery genre now known as cozies, both Eng­land and the Unit­ed States cel­e­brate today as Inter­na­tion­al Cozy Mys­tery Day. Offi­cial­ly, cozies are all about mur­der in a small com­mu­ni­ty that is solved by some­one oth­er than the police. (Ama­teur detec­tive, please step for­ward!)

Eng­lish cozies can be quite man­ner­ly, with Lords and Ladies. Amer­i­can cozies often involved dogs or cats, and espe­cial­ly food, or a small shop that sells a vari­ety of things.

Cozy com­mu­ni­ties come in all vari­eties: small towns, fish­ing vil­lages, farm com­mu­ni­ties, the sea shore, and even aboard ship. The time zone may cer­tain­ly be cur­rent, but many cozies are set in the past. Some are even set in the future. There might be ghosts involved, arti­fi­cial intel­li­gence, or aliens, and even romance. Hol­i­days bring out a new batch of titles. (Noth­ing quite like a lit­tle mur­der for Hal­loween, right?) In fact, any­thing or any­one can be includ­ed in a cozy — except a tru­ly grue­some killing, a world-wide threat, or a pro­fes­sion­al crime solver!

I’ve illus­trat­ed a bit of vari­ety with twelve cov­ers. A cou­ple of authors answered when I asked for vol­un­teers. Some, I select­ed from a Gup­py post. (Gup­pies are Sis­ters in Crime mem­bers.) I’ve read some of the books myself. And, oth­ers I just hap­pened to have the cov­er copied to my can­va dot come file. (Made it easy.) Some of the titles are quite old, some brand new. (I’m enclos­ing the Kin­dle links I find at Ama­zon — one is only avail­able in print.)

What cozy do you love the most? Do you have a cozy series you can’t get enough of? One of my favorites is the series that includes Click Here For Murder by Don­na Andrews. Unfor­tu­nate­ly, I must be in the minor­i­ty, as her pub­lish­er only want­ed four of them. There def­i­nite­ly was an over­all ongo­ing plot that nev­er hap­pened. (Oh, and the fact that the alpha­bet now ends at Y. But that one is under­stand­able.)

Death By Dis­ser­ta­tionChrist­mas Cocoa Mur­derDown in FlamesPor­trait of a Dead GuyClick Here for Mur­derCliff Hang­erA Souf­fle of Sus­pi­cionJudge Thee NotThe Fam­i­ly WayStran­gled Eggs and HamPlay It Again, SpamFat Cat at Large

New history mystery — on preorder

Killer Debt — Mystery on the battle line

Now that my blog is work­ing again, I can belat­ed­ly tell you about an his­toric mys­tery from one of my favorite authors. This month it’s on * pre-order * with an option of perks. (Since I’m so late, some of the perks are no longer avail­able.) But let’s for­get that and focus on the book. It will come out in May and is the newest in the Michael Stod­dard series. Stod­dard is an Eng­lish offi­cer under orders to pro­tect an Amer­i­can arriv­ing under white flag to con­sult with the British. His main adver­sary is anoth­er British offi­cer, as he also strives to keep an Amer­i­can lady safe. (Or, maybe I’m say­ing too much here? Can I men­tion that they real­ly do like each oth­er?)

Author Suzanne Adair brings our Amer­i­can his­to­ry to the pages, shin­ing a light on much that has been for­got­ten about our past. The sto­ry is fic­tion, but the his­to­ry under­ly­ing this mys­tery is real. What bet­ter way to dis­cov­er the for­got­ten past than in a thriller that por­trays colo­nial life as well as Eng­lish and Amer­i­can sen­ti­ments in our Rev­o­lu­tion­ary War? While you are on the site linked above, (set off by stars), check out the video telling more, the link to Suzanne read­ing chap­ter one, and a link to a PDF of the first chap­ter.

 

I Love a Mystery — Historic Mysteries

Three Favorite Historic Mysteries

My favorite books are mys­ter­ies, true, but I like to read in sev­er­al gen­res. When I find a delight­ful his­toric mys­tery, I’m dou­bly thrilled. In fact, I so love his­tor­i­cal mys­ter­ies, I have to show­case three series. 

Five Stars for MAIDS OF MISFORTUNE

My five-star pick this week com­bines two of my loves—mystery and his­toric fic­tion. Maids of Mis­for­tune takes place in 1879 San Fran­cis­co. A young wid­ow sup­ports her­self as board­ing house own­er Annie Fuller, and, in dis­guise, as psy­chic Sibyl who gives per­son­al and finan­cial advice to clients. As a woman, she knows that no one would ever accept such advice from her, but they will accept it as com­ing from the stars. When one of her clients dies, sup­pos­ed­ly by sui­cide, she knows his finances weren’t in the sham­bles the police claim. When the police real­ize it was mur­der, they look to his fam­i­ly. Annie pos­es as a serv­ing girl for the fam­i­ly to find the truth.

The author, M. Louisa Locke, seam­less­ly puts the read­er square­ly in that time and place. While we are engrossed in the plot we notice the work involved to keep up a house, the atti­tudes of every­one toward a Chi­nese cook, Annie’s belat­ed real­iza­tion of what her laun­dry girl does, and the prob­lems of trav­el and com­mu­ni­ca­tion in an ear­li­er age.

Maids of Mis­for­tune is the first of a series (the ebook is now free). There are sev­er­al short sto­ries as well. The fourth full-length mys­tery in the series will be out this month.

Of inter­est to the writ­ers among my read­ers, M. Louisa Locke’s blog shares her ongo­ing mar­ket­ing plans for an inde­pen­dent writer. (Next week I’ll revis­it the upcom­ing Agatha awards with anoth­er good read.)