War of 1812 in St. Michaels

cover-St Michaels bookSt. Michaels, Md. calls itself “The Town That Fooled The British.” During the War of 1812, there were as many as six shipbuilders in and near St. Michaels. One ship they produced was a fast schooner (later known as the Baltimore clipper). These vessels were well suited for outrunning pirates or foreign naval vessels at sea. A military battery was stationed at St. Michaels to protect the town and the shipyards. On August 10, 1813, the British attacked. However, the residents had turned off any lights in their homes and hung lanterns high in the trees. As a result, most of the cannon balls sailed over and beyond the village. One house  was hit by a cannonball. It went through the roof, and bounced down the stairs next to a child sitting there. (She told all about it in later years.) There are other stories of that time in the book—about the women sewing an American flag, about the battle against the military battery, about getting information from a British deserter, and about a farmer on a nearby island who tried to fool St. Michaels.

Several years ago, when my husband and I were sailing on Chesapeak Bay Maritime museum2Chesapeake Bay, we often stopped at St. Michaels and tied up in a slip next to the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum (shown here). Of course, I shopped for souvenirs. I purchased the booklet shown above. The story is engrossing. I vowed to write about the War of 1812 someday. That day arrived in 2013, and my mystery is now finished. It is in the process of cover design and manuscript formatting, to be published this summer. So, I haven’t hit exactly 200 years from 1813, when the St. Michaels incident occurred, but the war officially ended in 2015. Shortly, Forgotten Body, the second in the Jo Durbin Mysteries, will be published. It isn’t exactly about the war, but it does involve a reenactment of the Forgotten War of 1812.